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To Sir, With Love (Obama)

Discussion in 'News & Politics' started by Halloween, Jan 10, 2017.  |  Print Topic

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  1. cplolo
    Moonlighting

    cplolo Bro
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    My proof is your own words. Anyone who said the things you did in your first post on this thread is logically either deluded and ignorant, or unconsciously racist. Possibly both.
     
  2. DinoMom
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    DinoMom Moldovan Mother of Dragons!
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    Fine, you can feel that way if it makes you happy.

    But any president who is going to ease tension between Russia and the USA is welcome to try, as far as I'm concerned.

    Obama did not do that, nor did he provide any diplomatic or political reason for me to support him. As I have justified my line of reasoning before, there's no point repeating myself...

    You can continue to go around labelling people as racists without making an cogent points, if you think it will achieve anything.
     
  3. Halloween
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    Not to discredit, your admission (or 'desire' I should say. You chose your words carefully in the original thread as to not admit to committing the crime yourself.) to raping animals, leaves me with zero interest on anything you have to say. You may very well have relevant political views to make. But your twisted, disgusting ideas and desires? they make anything you have to say irrelevant.

    These are my last direct words to you ever on this site.
    You are disgusting. And if you ever touched an animal, you should be in prison.
     
  4. Trionaid
    Buzzed

    Trionaid Dedicative Advisor
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    Have you ever compared crime rates in heavily armed America versus unarmed Europe?

    Guns are dangerous, drawing one turns any dispute into a zero sum life or death situation. More Americans are killed in gun accidents than are saved in self defense.

    Also, what's the deal with trying to defend yourself with an AR-15? They're designed for engagement over 100m, that's outside any self defense envelope. The over penetration alone is more dangerous to your family than anything else.
     
  5. cplolo
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    And you can continue to ignore your own racial bias if it's too uncomfortable to admit
     
  6. DinoMom
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    DinoMom Moldovan Mother of Dragons!
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    Well aren't you an unpleasant person.

    1) legally I cannot commit rape.

    2) you cannot make accusations like that without proof. In this case there is none.

    3) in many places it is not a crime. If we really want to get down to the terminology, it's a crime to penetrate an animal which I cannot do anyway.

    4) you no doubt hate when people feel disgust at your sexual interests and desires. You hate people who are intolerant of gay and trans people. Look at your behaviour here. You are very quick to judge for someone who complains of being judged.

    5) add to this that my sexual desires, no matter what they might be, have NOTHING TO do with a political debate. How about I view all gay men as being disgusting and therefore ignore their political views?
    --- Double Post Merged, Jan 11, 2017 ---
    You said you love BILL CLINTON. a womaniser and a rapist.

    The hypocrisy is unbelievable.
     
    #26 DinoMom, Jan 11, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  7. cplolo
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    Wow.
     
  8. Halloween
    Batty

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    Is that statement meant to be pro or anti Obama?
    Cuz..


    "The Gun Industry Says It Has Grown 158% Since Obama Took Office"


    "the total economic impact of the firearms and ammunition industry in the U.S. increased from $19.1 billion in 2008 to $49.3 billion in 2015. "
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/frankmi...own-158-since-obama-took-office/#31a0093256ae

    Obama is the best thing to happen to the NRA and NSSF

    https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/latest-crime-statistics-released

    September 26, 2016
    Latest Crime Statistics Released
    Increase in Violent Crime, Decrease in Property Crime

    [​IMG]

    With all these guns on the street you would think crime would start to drop any day now.
    Hell with this many guns, mixed with that logic, there should be ZERO crime right?

    Yet every-time I turn on the news, there is a new massacre at a at a college, a high-school, a middle school, an elementary school. Or night club, and airport, or a church.


    Obama's Interview Marc Maron

    "There are actions that could be taken to make events like this less likely. And one of those actions we could take would be to enhance some basic, common-sense gun safety laws that, by the way, a majority of gun owners support. This is unique to our country. There is no other advanced nation on earth that tolerates multiple shootings on a regular basis and considers it normal....The question is just, is there a way of accommodating that legitimate set of traditions with some common-sense stuff that prevents a 21-year-old who is angry about something or confused about something or is racist or is deranged from going into a gun store and suddenly is packing and can do enormous harm. And that is something that we have not ever fully come to terms with and unfortunately, the grip of the NRA on Congress is extremely strong. I don't foresee any legislative action being taken in this Congress, and I don't foresee any real action being taken until the American public feels a sufficient sense of urgency and they say to themselves, 'This is not normal.'"
     
    #28 Halloween, Jan 11, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  9. GreasyMoose
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    I can't believe how horrid people are being to Dinomom and how personal this has gotten, if it's to prove a logical point regarding the thread then you're missing the point of why ad hominem is a logical fallacy.

    I agree with Dinomom, Obama was a man who did good work for the LGBT, but beyond being a competent place holder I don't there was anything exceptional about him. Obama isn't a deity, we can evaluate him you know, he did do good things for the LGBT, but it's ok to have the opinion he wasn't exceptional, even if you do support him. I voted for Cameron, I still thought he was a bit of a wet noodle and not really exceptional either... But actually taking the the step to challenge someone for being a racist because they don't think this man is exceptional, that's just a bit ludicrous isn't it? It really devalues what racism is too as well as lowering the tone of the debate.

    If we disagree that's fine, but can't we do it in a civil way, without the personal stuff? A lot of the time disagreements just come from linguistic flaws, whilst feelings aren't really that different... I think talking things out are always better than brash insults in an open dialogue.

    This is what I meant when I said its ok to have mixed feelings, I think Bill Clinton probably helped the LGBT. But although the media like to make him out as some kind of funny happy go lucky guy with women, I also think he was a vile rapist, and monstrous towards women on a startling scale... Not even starting with the well known scandal. But if other people think he is a wonderful person, and overlooks or disagrees with some of the allegations, that's fine.

    Why?

    I'm not supporting those kind of fantasies. But if some lass has a dog come up and do its thing, lick them out or whatever, I don't think it's anymore disgusting than the 20% of people in the LGBT who have a fecal fetish. Probably less likely to get a disease with former too...

    Anyway, I hardly see how this is relevant to the topic. You should have just blocked Dinomom.
     
    #29 GreasyMoose, Jan 11, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  10. Halloween
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    10 ways Obama promoted LGBT rights abroad

    [​IMG]
    The promotion of LGBT rights abroad was a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy during President Obama’s second term. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

    The promotion of LGBT and intersex rights abroad has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy during President Obama’s second term.

    Here is a look back at 10 of the Obama administration’s most notable achievements for LGBT rights abroad.



    #1 2011 presidential memorandum



    Obama on Dec. 6, 2011, directed agencies that implement U.S. foreign policy to promote LGBT and intersex rights abroad. He issued the presidential memorandum on the same day that then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivered her “gay rights are human rights” speech in Geneva.


    #2 Randy Berry’s appointment


    The State Department on Feb. 23, 2015, announced it had named Randy Berry as the first special U.S. envoy to promote LGBT and intersex rights abroad.


    [​IMG]


    Berry assumed his post within the State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor in April 2015. The career foreign service officer has traveled to Jamaica, Uganda, Australia and more than 40 other countries.

    #3 Openly gay ambassadors


    Obama in 2013 nominated six openly gay men to represent his administration overseas.

    James “Wally” Brewster, James Costos, Rufus Gifford, John Berry and Dan Baer assumed their posts in the Dominican Republic, Spain and Andorra, Denmark, Australia and at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe in Vienna after the U.S. Senate confirmed their respective nominations.

    Ted Osius, who is a founding member of GLIFAA, an organization that represents LGBT foreign service personnel, was sworn in as the U.S. ambassador to Vietnam on Dec. 10, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg on Aug. 8, 2015,presided over the ceremony during which Osius and his husband, Clayton Bond, renewed their wedding vows.


    #4 Global Equality Fund



    The Global Equality Fund is a public-private partnership the State Department manages with the U.S. Agency for International Development. It has contributed more than $33 million to global LGBT advocacy efforts since its 2011 inception.


    #5 USAID bans discrimination among contractors


    A USAID rule that formally bans contractors from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity took effect on Oct. 25, 2015.

    The new policy does not require contractors to extend nondiscrimination protections to employees of organizations abroad that receive U.S. funding. It also does not include USAID grantees.


    #6 Uganda sanctioned after anti-gay law signed


    The Obama administration in 2014 announced a series of sanctions against Uganda after the country’s president signed the Anti-Homosexuality Bill that sought to impose a life sentence upon anyone found guilty of repeated same-sex sexual acts.

    The White House banned Ugandan officials responsible for human rights abuses from entering the U.S. The Obama administration also discontinued or redirected funds for programs with the Ugandan Police Force, the Ugandan Ministry of Health and National Public Health Institute.

    A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention agreement that funded the salaries of Ugandan Ministry of Health employees who supported the country’s response to the HIV/AIDS ended in February 2014. The U.S. later suspended a study to identify groups at risk for HIV/AIDS the CDC had planned to conduct with a Ugandan university.

    President Yoweri Museveni signed the Anti-Homosexuality Bill into law on Feb. 24, 2014. The Constitutional Court of Uganda a few months later struck down the statute on a technicality.


    #7 Obama meets with Cuban LGBT activists

    Two LGBT rights activists were among the members of Cuban civil society who met with Obama in Havana on March 22, 2016. The meeting took place during the president’s historic trip to the Communist island.

    [​IMG]


    Obama on Dec. 17, 2014, announced the U.S. would restore diplomatic relations with Cuba that had ended in 1961.



    #8 LGBT-inclusive delegation travels to Sochi Olympics



    Obama tapped three openly LGBT athletes to represent the U.S. at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

    Retired tennis champion Billie Jean King was unable to attend the games’ opening ceremony with the rest of the U.S. delegation because of her mother’s health. Figure skater Brian Boitano and Caitlin Cahow, an Olympic ice hockey player, traveled to Sochi.


    [​IMG]


    Russian President Vladimir Putin in 2013 signed a law that bans the promotion of so-called gay propaganda to minors. The statute and the Kremlin’s overall LGBT rights record overshadowed the games.


    #9 Obama talks LGBT rights in Africa

    Obama throughout his second-term has spoken publicly against anti-LGBT laws in Africa.

    The president spoke against the criminalization of consensual same-sex sexual relations during a June 27, 2013, press conference in Dakar, Senegal, with the country’s president.

    Senegal is among the countries in which consensual same-sex sexual relations remain criminalized. The press conference took place a day after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a portion of the Defense of Marriage Act in its landmark Windsor decision.

    Obama again raised LGBT rights during a July 25, 2015, press conference with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta in Nairobi.


    #10 U.S. seeks release of Malaysian opposition leader



    The State Department and other administration officials have urged the Malaysian government to release a leading opposition figure who is serving a 5-year prison sentence for sodomy.

    Senior members of the National Security Council met with the family of former Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim in the Malaysian capital of Kuala Lumpur on Nov. 21, 2015. The meeting coincided with Obama’s visit to the Southeast Asian country.

    Kerry raised Anwar’s case with Prime Minister Najib Razak during their meeting on Aug. 5, 2015.
    [​IMG]
    https://www.washingtonblade.com/2017/01/11/obama-white-house-promotes-lgbt-rights-abroad/

     
  11. DinoMom
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    DinoMom Moldovan Mother of Dragons!
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    This is hilarious. Obama promoted LGBT rights by sanctioning Uganda? I hope you understand that sanctions against countries make life worse for its citizens, not better. Especially persecuted minorities who become even stronger scapegoats. Sanctions firm resolve.

    Like how Obama has sanctioned Russia. Russians detest him for it.

    As for Sochi, Obama and Stephen Fry famously embarrassed themselves by treating mother Russia like a delinquent child.
     
    #31 DinoMom, Jan 12, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  12. cplolo
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    Who knows, when Trump and Putin become bum chums, maybe Russia and the US can join forces, and the white race will reign supreme.

    GreasyMoose Did I say or imply anywhere that Obama is a deity? Of course we are allowed to evaluate him and so we should. I'm not going to call anyone a racist just because they dislike Obama or don't think he's exceptional, so try a different reading.

    But when someone comes to a thread posted in Obama's honor, and states that there is nothing positive to say about him, while at the same time affording a white billionaire the benefit of the doubt despite his proven and obvious detestable behaviour, (minimized and dismissed as 'his fair share of scandal), then I feel justified in pointing out their internalized racism and / or bias and I stand by it.
     
    #32 cplolo, Jan 12, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  13. GreasyMoose
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    I was speaking hyperbole. I just thought your reaction to defend Obama in such a personal way was a bit unusual, not saying it's bad to disagree. Just those accusations of racism seemed unwarranted. Would it have still been racist to have said you you'd be glad for the republican Ben Carson instead of Trump to succeed Obama for presidency? He is a shade blacker than Obama...

    The whole context of those accusations is ludicrous when you don't know anything about Dinomom's own race or relationships with Xenos.

    The mirror image of your accusation would be me calling you a deluded ethnomasochist. But you see how crazy that sounds?
     
  14. Halloween
    Batty

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    [​IMG]

    Aaron Hicklin: Mr. President, who was the first person you met who you knew was gay?


    President Barack Obama: I’m not sure who the first openly gay person I met was, but Dr. Lawrence Goldyn, one of my college professors, is a man who stands out to me. I took his class freshman year at Occidental. I was probably 18 years old — Lawrence was one of the younger professors — and we became good friends. He went out of his way to advise lesbian, gay, and transgender students at Occidental, and keep in mind, this was 1978. That took a lot of courage, a lot of confidence in who you are and what you stand for. I got to recognize Lawrence last year at our Pride Month reception at the White House, and thank him for influencing the way I think about so many of these issues.


    When was the moment that you realized that LGBT equality would be a key focus for your administration?


    This really goes back to when I was a kid, because my mom instilled in me the strong belief that every person is of equal worth. At the same time, growing up as a black guy with a funny name, I was often reminded of exactly what it felt like to be on the outside. One of the reasons I got involved in politics was to help deliver on our promise that we’re all created equal, and that no one should be excluded from the American dream just because of who they are. That’s why, in the Senate, I supported repealing DOMA [the Defense of Marriage Act]. It’s why, when I ran for president the first time, I publicly asked for the support of the LGBT community, and promised that we could bring about real change for LGBT Americans.


    Watching Sasha and Malia grow up, are you conscious of a generational difference in their attitudes to homosexuality versus the generation(s) before them?

    Absolutely. To Malia and Sasha and their friends, discrimination in any form against anyone doesn’t make sense. It doesn’t dawn on them that friends who are gay or friends’ parents who are same-sex couples should be treated differently than anyone else. That’s powerful. My sense is that a lot of parents across the country aren’t going to want to sit around the dinner table and try to justify to their kids why a gay teacher or a transgender best friend isn’t quite as equal as someone else. That’s also why it’s so important to end harmful practices like conversion therapy for young people and allow them to be who they are. The next generation is spurring change not just for future generations, but for my generation, too. As president, and as a dad, that makes me proud. It makes me hopeful.


    When you were a community organizer in the South Side of Chicago in the 1980s, one of the principal issues was housing. Was the impact of AIDS and HIV a part of that?

    In Chicago in the 1980s, as was the case across the country, Americans living with HIV/AIDS were unfairly evicted from their homes, fired from their jobs, and forced to face social, economic, and personal atrocities — which is to say nothing of the health problems they were dealing with. That’s one of the reasons that my administration developed the first-ever comprehensive National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States. People living with HIV are benefiting from more effective collaboration across the federal government. By the way, they’re also benefiting from the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, which allows for funding increases and groundbreaking new work towards an AIDS-free generation.

    In your 2013 inauguration speech you delighted the LGBT community by including Stonewall alongside Seneca Falls and Selma as a touchstone of America’s progressive history. Tell me about the decision to mention Stonewall in the speech.

    Part of being American is having a responsibility to stand up for freedom — not just our own freedom, but for everybody’s freedom. Our individual stories come together to make one large American story. Just like Seneca Falls is part of the American story, and Selma is part of the American story, Stonewall is part of the American story, and I thought it was important to say so.

    The Supreme Court decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, that the fundamental right to marry should be guaranteed to LGBT couples, was one you described as a “victory for America.” How confident were you that SCOTUS would vote the way it did?


    Well, I try not to guess how the Supreme Court is going to rule. But even before the decision came down, one thing was clear: There had been a remarkable attitude shift — in hearts and minds — across America. The ruling reflected that. It reflected our values as a nation founded on the principle that we are all created equal. And, by the way, it was decades of our brothers and sisters fighting for recognition and equality — and too frequently risking their lives or facing rejection from family, friends, and co-workers — that got us to that moment. So I wasn’t surprised by the Supreme Court’s decision, but, like millions of Americans, I was proud and happy that it came down the way it did — and I was honored to stand in the Rose Garden and reiterate for every American that we are strongest, that we are most free, when all of us are treated equally. I was proud to say that love is love.


    What advice would you give to the Kim Davises of America who feel they are being forced to choose between the law and their conscience?

    I am a man of faith and believe deeply in religious freedom, but at the end of the day, nobody is above the rule of law — especially someone who voluntarily takes an oath to uphold that law. That’s something we’ve got to respect.

    In Kenya this year you likened the LGBT experience in Africa to the civil rights struggle of African-Americans in the U.S. Not everyone has been a fan of the comparison. Why do you think it’s valuable to tie these struggles together in this way?

    I made that comparison because I think it’s an accurate one. As I said in Kenya, in a lot of ways what we’re talking about is equality under the law — that was a critical element of the civil rights movement in the United States, and that is an essential part of the struggle that LGBT people are facing around the world.

    I think this is both a question of attitudes and a question of behavior. Accepting and embracing someone for who they are requires a change in attitude. And in the United States we’ve seen that change in attitude, in many hearts and minds, as more and more LGBT people are brave enough to come out and live their lives openly, and as their relatives and neighbors and co-workers realize that they know and like and love a member of the LGBT community.

    The other part is behavior. Regardless of their personal views, we need to treat one another with a basic level of respect. And governments need to enforce the law, prosecute acts of violence, and protect the human rights of their citizens — all of their citizens — without discrimination.

    I also think that it’s important for us to acknowledge our own history. In the United States we talk a lot about working to perfect our union. And there is a lot of work to be done with respect to civil rights in the United States — for African-Americans, LGBT people, for many others. When I travel around the world and speak to foreign audiences, I think it is helpful when I acknowledge our own shortcomings and speak honestly about our history and the lessons we’ve learned along the way instead of pretending that we have all the answers. I think it also helps build the trust and openness we need to work together as countries to meet a whole range of challenges.


    We have lots of alliances with countries that do not respect LGBT rights, such as Saudi Arabia. How can the U.S. play a constructive role in challenging those regimes on their human rights record?

    Promoting and protecting the human rights of all people, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity, is a fundamental part of our foreign policy and an element of our engagements with governments all over the world, including our close partners.

    When we talk about LGBT issues, we emphasize the importance of universal human rights — the right to freedom of expression, association, and peaceful assembly and the importance of non-violence, non-discrimination, and equality under the law — and those don’t change or go away just because someone is a member of the LGBT community. So, while some people try to claim that homosexuality doesn’t exist in their culture or that we are trying to impose “foreign” values, the truth is that LGBT people are members of all societies and the protection of human rights is a universal value.

    How we deliver that message may change from country to country. Sometimes I do so in public speeches. Other times, we may do so in private, during meetings with foreign governments. Yes, it can make for some difficult conversations, but the United States will continue to raise our voice on behalf of universal human rights.

    http://www.out.com/out100-2015/2015/11/10/out100-president-barack-obama-ally-year
     
  15. Halloween
    Batty

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  16. cplolo
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    Nah bro, I know bias when I see it.

    I based my response on what she wrote.
     
  17. Halloween
    Batty

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    *sigh*
    Guess I will weight in on the race debate...

    --Though I must say, I would have rather an Anti-Obama user on here, created their own thread to list their anti-reasons.
    Or a pro-Trump thread to discuss why they like him. Rather than sitting around waiting for someone to make a Pro-Obama thread, and then realize they have so much to say on the subject, and attempt to hijack someone elses.

    One would think the "Not Our President" (or even better a brand new thread)would have made a better thread to debate Trump, rather than a thread dedicated to Obama and everything he has done for Queer people

    To anyone who is so quick to so sharply criticize a President that has done more in the way of equality than any other President in the history of the world's democracy, says more about your character than it does of his.--.


    On the subject of race, I'm not saying that all Trump supporters are automatically racists, but as I stated earlier...
    Typically I am against generalizing, but in this case I do feel it's justified when people do so.

    Before this election, I would have thought that anyone who ran for President in this modern time, who was also endorsed by the KKK and other White-Supremacist groups would not only lose the election, but be publicly shamed and have their career in politics ruined.

    Would it have made someone less of an anti-Semitic Nazi, if they said
    "I don't like what Hitler is doing to the jews, but I think he has a good economic plan to get me a better job, so I'll vote for him." ?

    I think that "writer, speaker & internet yeller" Ijeoma Oluo did a flawless job months ago explaining this subject,

    "If you believe that you are actively against White Supremacy and yet you will support Trump, you are lying to yourself. People are being hurt right now by the racism that Trump is peddling, by the bravado that the legitimization of this election is giving to White Supremacists. What in the world could Trump possibly be offering you that would cause you to overlook all of the above?"

    "And I’m not willing to coddle you. I’m not willing to create a safe space for you to be able to elect White Supremacy into law without being called what you are: an unabashed, willful proponent of White Supremacy. There is no “middle ground” to be found here. There is no “compromise” between equality and violent White Supremacy. And there is no “gentler way” of confronting racism when my basic humanity as a woman of color is not enough to sway you against electing a regime that is built on the hatred and fear of people who look like me. And those of us directly harmed by the disgusting hate you’re trying to elect into office will not forget that you traded away our safety and humanity for empty promises of “winning” and “greatness.” We see you for who you really are."
     
    #37 Halloween, Jan 12, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  18. Halloween
    Batty

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  19. Halloween
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  20. Halloween
    Batty

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    "Yet Another Reason Joe Biden Is Everyone's Favorite LGBT Ally"
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    Anything you can do, allies, Joe Biden has already done.

    The vice president once again showed LGBT allies how to model support. This time, he tweeted a photo on Tuesday taken when he officiated the wedding of two men who were White House staffers. The internet went wild for the image, taken when Brian Mosteller, director of Oval Office operations, and Joe Mashie, a trip coordinator for the first lady, got hitched at a ceremony held at Biden’s own home. They reportedly asked the vice president for the honor.

    President Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have yet to officiate a same-sex wedding. But given Biden’s track record on these things, he’s probably ahead of a trend. Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s already done it, and so has New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, but Biden is still ahead of the curve.

    Full story:
    http://www.advocate.com/politics/2016/8/02/yet-another-reason-joe-biden-everyones-favorite-lgbt-ally


     

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