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Trigger Warning! Service Dogs for Survivors Of Violence

Discussion in 'General (Off Topic)' started by Most Bald, Oct 12, 2019.  |  Print Topic

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  1. Most Bald
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    Most Bald Thinking of a more humane human world.
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    Greetings! ThIs is a query about whether you believe LGBTQ+ community members who are survivors of violent crime and who are affected by mood and/or anxiety disorders may value a LGBTQ+ welcoming organization that provided service dogs and supported their handlers in living inspired lives?

    Bias is sometimes a challenge when searching for service providers. Having LGBTQ folks involved in the leadership in a provider organization would be a good move, I believe.

    Thoughts?

    Thank you.


    Most Bald
     
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    #1 Most Bald, Oct 12, 2019
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  2. Tragic

    Tragic Dedicative Contributor
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    It sounds like a good idea. I may not be suitable because I have a fear of dogs. I do need exposure therapy.
     
  3. Most Bald
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    Most Bald Thinking of a more humane human world.
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    Thank you, Tragic. Yes, I guess it could be a little inconvenient if you are dog-phobic.

    We were once asked to consult with someone who very much wanted a dog, however the prospective dog handler was very concerned about dog saliva and was repulsed by the thought of being licked. It was enough of a concern that the client ultimately decided that not being licked was a significant part of the customization of their dog’s training.

    Different strokes for different folks...

    - Most Bald
     
    #3 Most Bald, Oct 13, 2019
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  4. Claire15

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    I kind of like feel uncomfortable around big dogs...
    When i was little every single dog i met goes like weird around me..
    So i tend to stay away from dogs.. I've not tried to build a relationship with a dog... like ever.. i'm a cat person.
     
  5. Most Bald
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    Most Bald Thinking of a more humane human world.
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    Claire15,

    One day, you might have an occasion to develop a relationship with a dog, perhaps not. I think it’s great that you enjoy cats.

    - Most Bald
     
  6. Tragic

    Tragic Dedicative Contributor
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    I have thought about it. I would consider having a service dog. These are professionally trained dogs and I need support.
     
  7. Claire15

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    I cannot have animal friends in my house.. Its that kinda situation. And i don't get out much to get to know even people let alone their dogs. But i'd love to get to know one sometime.. Maybe in the future, Dogs are amazing.
    I have cats around,In the neighbor hood, And they like me <3 lol
     
  8. SpilerM
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    I raise dog and have official pedigree kennel. When I brought my first dog it helped me soooooo much. I never thinked it will have such a big help on me and it was not a therapy dog. Just a simply family member. Sadly she passed away, but thanks to her I improved a lot and built self-confidence. So I would definitely think this is a very good idea!
     
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  9. Most Bald
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    Most Bald Thinking of a more humane human world.
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    Hey SpilerM! How’s it going?

    I’m curious? What do you breed? Dogs can truly be life savers! Magic can develop in the bond that develops.

    Most Bald
     
  10. Claire15

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    Most Bald I've a question for you, Just a little curiosity , Since you seem knowledgeable about dogs..
     
  11. Most Bald
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    Most Bald Thinking of a more humane human world.
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    Hey, Claire15! How can I help?
     
  12. Claire15

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    So this is just my observation..
    Dogs are very sensitive by nature.. They can sense so many things humans can't .. not just smell of matter... I find they can pick up a lot of frequencies.. and perceive way more than a human being can by default..
    But the thing i noticed is, the more they are trained by humans, they more they are 'civilized' the more they become like humans and the lesser their sensitivity gets? I mean.. only humans used to go mad... no other creatures. but now humans have started to influence other creatures too.. like i find dogs can get mad now.. lol just a crazy observation.. If you lock em in a cage for a while.. they get that way.. it wasn't that way before..
     
  13. Most Bald
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    Most Bald Thinking of a more humane human world.
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    Claire15,

    Your message reminds me of discussions I’ve been part of in other forums. Here’s my take…

    For a very long time, my position has been that I wouldn’t want to live with untrained or less-than-well socialized dogs. I believe that dogs vary in the depth and breadth of their sensitivity. Dogs that have not been adequately prepared (or that may be damaged) often have difficulty in community life.

    Unfortunately, dogs that are damaged or improperly prepared often are placed in settings where the dog owners are uninformed and perhaps overly emotional. I believe this is a problem because for many people, they convince themselves that once they bring an animal home - they are committed to keeping that animal in their home. They lose sight of certain considerations.

    Many of the dogs that we work with are from animal welfare organizations, of one type or another. Many pet owners are not in a place, emotionally or financially to deal with certain behavioral issues. It’s not uncommon for us to learn that the pet owners (and some would-be service dog handlers) have no desire to make an effort to train and socialize their own dogs.

    We ask people to consider:

    Is this dog (of unknown background and temperament) a good fit for you, today? How do the physical exercise and social needs of this animal suit your abilities and interests? If the dog is very active, and gregarious, is that a good fit for where your lifestyle? Some will bring home a dog that displays characteristics that might suit someone who is an athlete or a social butterfly, but the new handler spends most of their time glued to their sofa or bed and the only thing active and athletic in their life is their Athlete’s Foot infection. It’s just an example of a potentially problematic mismatch. The needs of the person aren’t being met. Frequently, the needs of the dog are not addressed and this will often lead to behavioral issues that result in frustration or worse.

    Professional trainers typically capitalize on approaches to training that encourage dogs to offer a variety of types of behavior. The use of punishment has the opposite effect. With regard to service dogs and their sensitivity, we sometimes need to sift through a certain amount of romanticism. People sometimes believe what they want to believe about their dogs and dogs, in general. Dogs are mammals, so there are some reasonable parallels to draw upon, but (and this is important) dogs are not primates. They are not so closely related to humans. I believe we should be careful when we attribute human-like characteristics to our dogs.

    Claire15, you’ll have to tell me what you were thinking of when you mentioned dogs’ sensitivity. You may not be thinking of it in the context of service dog training, but that’s how I am often thinking about it. If I am asked to assess a dog a a service dog prospect and the person has an insane peanut allergy, but the dog doesn’t seem to be particularly curious about exploring new environments by sniffing around, then I would wonder if the dog can be easily encouraged to investigate. It may not be the best choice for this particular task. If the dog is curious and has a great ability to scent, then that would be very helpful to know.

    Training, I think, should be used to polish strengths that already are present. Time and other resources are important considerations, so we sometimes change directions and find a dog that’s better at the tasks we need performed.

    If your eyes haven’t fallen out of your head and if you have questions, I can write more, later.

    All the best,
    Most Bald

    P.S.- There’s tons of diversity in thinking about dogs, husbandry and what I call dog mythology.

    People sometimes disagree. Life goes on.
     

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